Why Should You Automate Your Experiments?

Poppy Roworth, Head of Laboratory at Arctoris, responds to the big question.

Running Laboratory Experiments: Manually versus Automated

I started a very long blog post during my PhD based on my experiences of science, aimed primarily at my non-scientific friends. I never finished it, mostly because of time constraints around my PhD and also because it became long and waffly. I will endeavour to do better here. Part of the first paragraph reads: “I do experiments, occasionally they work and I am happy. Mostly they don’t and I am sad, I cry into my crisp sandwich at my desk and then I go home and sleep ready to try again the following day”. Which pretty much sums up PhD life.

The thing is though, I spent SO long in the lab every day that I rarely had the opportunity to keep up to date with the latest scientific findings and this is not due to my poor time-management, but a phenomenon that the vast majority of lab-based scientists face.

The simple fact is that planning, running, and analysing experiments takes an awful lot of time and energy. Even if the experiments are ones you have performed many times before, for new types of experiments that may also require new pieces of equipment, this takes much longer. Additionally, for the most fancy pieces of kit, you need a PhD just to read the manual, or if you are lucky you can go on a 2-day training course. All of which slows down the project and takes more time. Time is limited for all scientists — whether a student with a hand-in date, a postdoc on grant funding that is running out, or as a scientist in a biotech where a clear result is required before the next funding round. The pressure is on from day 1 to maximise data output, but this can limit reading and analysis time which are ultimately the things that provide insight and creativity and really generate novel, groundbreaking ideas and discoveries.

Furthermore, as a cell biologist, I can tell you that a lot of my time is taken looking after my experiments. This doesn’t really require PhD level thought or expertise. You can be trained on how to do this in a few hours and after a few weeks, it is something I could do easily and routinely. Now, whilst I personally enjoy a little bit of cell culture, once you have over 10 cell lines you will be spending an enormous quantity of time doing something that does not require a highly-skilled professional to do. My record was, I think, 25 cell lines in culture at the same time. Which left me very little time to do anything else (e.g. producing actual data). The thing is though, although cell culture is an excellent example, it is hardly the only process in a lab scientist's life that takes a large amount of time while not necessarily requiring much thought or skill to carry out.

Time is limited for all scientists — whether a student with a hand-in date, a postdoc on grant funding that is running out, or as a scientist in a biotech where a clear result is required before the next funding round. The pressure is on from day 1 to maximise data output, but this can limit reading and analysis time which are ultimately the things that provide insight and creativity and really generate novel, groundbreaking ideas and discoveries.

Manual versus automated experiments at a glance

Although the process of automating experiments does have certain challenges it has come with a lot of benefits. I no longer have to manually pipette each well at a time of a 96 or 384 well plate, which is highly beneficial for my sanity when there is a stack of more than 5 or 10 to get through. This also means I don’t have to worry about accidentally missing a well out — if there is an error in dispensing this information is logged and sent as an error report which means I can decide how to fix this and rescue it if required (goodbye human error!). The accuracy and consistency which automation achieves is far greater than even the most dedicated and highly trained scientist — I finally have error bars I am proud of.

This gives me confidence in the data and in the project. Better data also means fewer unnecessary repeats, saving both time and money. The biggest benefit though is that once the automated protocol is written and everything is loaded I can press go and walk away. This can save hours of each day which allows me to work on other things such as planning the next experiment, designing new projects with clients, reading literature and seeing which experiments can feasibly be automated and keeping up to date with the other projects currently in the laboratory. For others, this time saving might enable them to spend time on developing different assays, analysing data, writing grants and papers.

The accuracy and consistency which automation achieves is far greater than that of even the most dedicated and highly trained scientist — I finally have error bars I am proud of.

Ultimately, automation reduces the time you spend on tedious and repetitive tasks and allows you to take on more interesting or challenging experiments instead. Automation is a powerful tool when used well and should be viewed as an aid to scientists, not as a replacement.

(Alice) Poppy Roworth DPhil is the Head of Laboratory at Arctoris. Poppy completed her DPhil in Oncology at the University of Oxford (Kellogg College) and her BSc in Biochemistry at the University of Southampton. She worked as a placement student for AstraZeneca in the Oncology iMED unit, employing robotic systems for drug discovery. Poppy has previously worked at OncoRay-Dresden as a Visiting Researcher. She actively promotes women in STEM and has won several awards as a biochemist.

About Arctoris Ltd

Arctoris Ltd is an Oxford-based research company that is revolutionising drug discovery for virtual and traditional biotechnology companies, pharmaceutical corporations and academia. Arctoris has established the world’s first fully automated drug discovery platform, offering pre-optimised and fully validated processes for its partners and customers globally. Accessible remotely, the platform provides on-demand access to a wide range of biochemical, cell biology and molecular biology assays conducted by robotics, enabling rapid, informed decision-making in basic biology, target validation, toxicology and phenotypic screening. These assay capabilities are accessed using a powerful online portal that streamlines experiment planning, ordering, tracking and data analysis. Thanks to the Arctoris platform, customers can rapidly, accurately and cost-effectively perform their research and advance their drug discovery programmes.

For more information, please visit www.arctoris.com or follow us on LinkedIn and Twitter. For media enquiries, contact media@arctoris.com.

We are the world’s first fully automated R&D platform generating drug discovery data on demand www.arctoris.com

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